Infrastructure new Zealand MEDIA RELEASES

Our media releases keep you up to date with the latest infrastructure developments in New Zealand.

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  • 18 May 2018 8:19 AM | Anonymous

    A panel of experts spoke to Mike Hosking about what the key sectors are expecting from this year's budget. Listen to Stephen's interview here.

  • 17 May 2018 4:43 PM | Anonymous

    MEDIA RELEASE

    “The Ardern-led Government’s first Budget has followed through on well-signalled investments in transport, housing, education and health, but greater use of private investment will be needed to get overall investment to the level required,” says Stephen Selwood, Chief Executive of Infrastructure New Zealand.

    “Additional capital investment of $750 million in hospitals, $400 million in schools and the $300 million Canterbury acceleration programme is in line with pre-Budget commitments and will go some way to addressing immediate needs, such as at Middlemore Hospital in South Auckland and continuing the Christchurch rebuild.

    “Confirmation too that transport spending and the Provincial Growth Fund will be resourced as indicated is welcome. However, just one third of the Provincial Fund is committed to capital projects with a significant part of the balance going to tree planting.

    “Funding has been confirmed for the design of a new Dunedin Hospital, but there is no specific allocation to construction, despite the decision not to proceed with a public private partnership.

    A $200 million commitment has been made to the delivery of rapid-build modular units for prisons but there is no provision for the major new prison at Waikeria that has been in planning.

    “One of the most encouraging Budget announcements is that arms-length government bodies like Housing New Zealand, NZ Transport Agency and Crown Infrastructure Partners are to be given the flexibility to raise debt, beginning the long-overdue shift away from “pay-go” funding for large, lumpy capital projects.   

    “Housing NZ alone will be able to borrow up to $3 billion to get on with delivering safe, warm homes.

    “The initiative should help speed up decision making, give greater certainty to the forward pipeline and facilitate engagement with industry.

    “Much wider use of this type of model is required to deliver Kiwibuild over the next decade, including the billions of dollars of infrastructure needed to support 100,000 homes.

    “No Budget allocation is clear yet regarding a specialised infrastructure agency, but it is just this sort of entity which would facilitate effective use of debt in the delivery of the Government’s large capital programme,” Selwood says.

    ENDS

    For further information and comment contact Stephen Selwood on 021 791 209


  • 15 May 2018 11:36 AM | Anonymous

    Read the article and listen to Stephen's interview here.

  • 10 May 2018 4:42 PM | Anonymous

    MEDIA RELEASE

    “The Government’s announcement that this year’s Budget will allocate $42 billion to capital investment over 5 years will provide a welcome boost for regional and urban development, but speed in establishing a specialised strategic procurement agency is now a priority to ensure projects are sequenced and delivered at best value,” said Stephen Selwood CEO of Infrastructure New Zealand.

    “Details of the exact programme will become clear on Budget day, but with major investment needs in health, education, justice, housing and of course transport, the challenge for the Government will be getting best value out of its programme.

    “There is a risk that costs will inflate if project sequencing stretches the market by location, portfolio or skillset.

    “A carefully-conceived project pipeline, developed with the industry and comprising the full spectrum of central and local government major projects, is essential to delivering a programme this large.

    “Just as important will be the way in which projects are procured.

    “Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones’ procurement agency idea now takes on immediate priority, not only to develop the project pipeline but also to ensure that hospitals, schools, roads, railways and other infrastructure are delivered on time, to specification and to budget.

    “Recent reports that the SuperFund has made an unsolicited bid to deliver light rail in Auckland underline how sophisticated major project procurement has become.

    “It’s great news that investors are looking at national infrastructure as an investment opportunity and we need serious expertise across government to ensure this type of approach will be a success.

    “A specialised procurement agency will consolidate public procurement expertise and enable the 5 year $42 billion pipeline to be delivered in a way which benefits all New Zealanders,” Selwood says.

    ENDS

    For further information and comment contact Stephen Selwood on 021 791 209
  • 10 May 2018 3:55 PM | Anonymous

    Listen to Stephen's interview here

  • 26 Apr 2018 3:57 PM | Anonymous

    Listen to Stephen's interview here

  • 17 Apr 2018 12:16 PM | Anonymous

    The New Zealand Government has restated its committed to resolving congestion and other transport issues in Auckland and across the country. It is widely agreed that conventional funding and financing tools are inadequate to address both the backlog of investment and respond to strong growth. 

    Infrastructure New Zealand welcomes news that the Government is actively investigating alternative procurement options, including Public-Private Partnerships, to enable major projects to proceed. 

    More information can be obtained here.  


  • 19 Mar 2018 11:45 AM | Anonymous

    MEDIA RELEASE

    “Cancellation of major projects, delays in new projects coming to market and uncertainty about future transport funding are forcing the contracting sector to release skilled staff just at the point at which the Government wants to increase the speed and scale of construction,” says Stephen Selwood CEO of Infrastructure New Zealand.

    “It is natural for infrastructure priorities to change with new leadership, but the scale of change in recent months combined with high uncertainty over future transport funding is having a particularly heavy effect on a sector under pressure from rising input costs.

    “The Government’s desire to utilise private capital to facilitate infrastructure delivery is commendable, as are commitments to increase Crown capital investment from $32b to $42b over the next four years, but it’s the lack of “shovel-ready” projects which is the problem.

    “Near-term cancellation of projects which the sector had anticipated getting underway shortly include the consented East-West Link, the Tauranga Northern Corridor, the Petone to Granada Link road and SH1 Cambridge to Piarere.

    “Delays to the CRL and north-western busway as well as uncertainty for critical growth projects like the Mill Rd corridor in Auckland and safety projects like Otaki to Levin north of Wellington is compounding the issue.  

    “All up, a conservative figure of the total investment pushed out of the next four to five-year period is over $2 billion. That’s in the order of $400 million per annum taken out of the contracting sector.

    “The industry cannot absorb that level of cost without rationalising staff and equipment – the same staff and equipment which we know are urgently needed today to deliver infrastructure for housing.

    “While it is not the Government’s job to keep the construction industry busy, a committed pipeline of work is fundamental to the productivity of the sector, thereby delivering value for tax-payers.

    “It is vital that near-term gaps in the project pipeline are not allowed to undermine the long term health and capacity of the construction sector.

    “Australian investment in transport is set to double in the next couple of years. The big Aussie contractors will absorb all the available skills we have spent a decade building up, risking a repeat of the 2000s from which we’re still recovering.

    “There are projects with consents ready to go, including Mill Rd and Penlink. These projects have very positive economic benefits and unlock land for housing. We know they are going to be delivered, they must be signed off.

    “These are urgent issues and if left unattended will materially impact our ability to deliver infrastructure and home construction programmes,” Selwood says.

    ENDS

    For further information and comment contact Stephen Selwood on 021 791 209


  • 16 Feb 2018 11:14 AM | Anonymous

    Read the article and listen to Stephen's interview here

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